Working With a Model of Color

February 24, 2015  •  2 Comments

 

Working With a Model of Color

NSFW

 

Clients come in all shapes, sizes and colors.   Skin tone is very important to photographers, since that plays a big role in making people look their best.  When we work with pale-skinned models, there are certain challenges.  For example, we normally don't want to let their skin get washed out or for the visible veins beneath the skin to be distracting.  

 

Working with darker skinned models is a lot of fun, in my opinion.  By adjusting the lighting and exposure, you can change their look dramatically.   It really brings out my creativity.

 

This model was willing to do a trade shoot with the idea that she may go into professional modeling.  She had almost no experience posing and was understandably nervous, but she had a great attitude and obviously had fun during the shoot.  

 

As I often do with darker complexions and hair, I chose to shoot in a style that is called "high key."    For me, this simply means that you put the model in front of a white background and you flood the studio with light.  If you want to see a more complete explanation, click the link.

 

Photoshoot for an African American modelA model of colorWorking with darker skinned models is a bit different than lighter skinned models.

 

When I start working with a model, I try to learn how different angles affect the shape of her face. During this time, I also learn how she responds to the camera and I help her relax.  I don't really expect to get great images during this time, it's all about establishing a link between photographer and model.

 

A model of color in the studioA model of color in the studioWorking with darker skinned models is a bit different than lighter skinned models.

 

When I get a nice image, I show it to the model using the screen on the back of the camera.  The large LCD screen on the 5D Mark III is nice for that.  It helps the model feel like she is contributing.    You can see her relax and enjoy the experience as the shoot proceeds.  But first...

 

 

CloseupCloseupThis shows the clarity and resolution of the Canon 5D Mark III with the Canon 50mm 1.2 L lens at F/2.8

 

 

I also use the LCD screen to check on the focus accuracy of the lens I'm using.  Most of this shoot was done with the specialized Canon 50mm F/1.2 L lens that is a favorite with portrait and wedding photographers.  Most of the shots you see here were done at F/2.8.  Look at the hair in the next three images.  You can see that the furthest part of the hair is a little blurred, but not as much as if I had been shooting wide open.

 

 

A model of colorA model of colorWorking with darker skinned models is a bit different than lighter skinned models.

A Model of ColorA Model of ColorWorking with darker skinned models is a bit different than lighter skinned models.

 

A Model of ColorA Model of ColorWorking with darker skinned models is a bit different than lighter skinned models.

 

In the shot above, the skin tone of the model is looking pretty light.  It's fun, but it's not really a good representation of how she looks in real life.  At this point I decided to do a few low-key shots so that she would have more choices to pick from in her images.

 

 

A Low Key photo of our lovely darker modelA Low Key photo of our lovely darker modelWorking with darker skinned models is a bit different than lighter skinned models.

Ah, this is a more realistic depiction.  Let's try some more variations.

 

 

A Model of ColorA Model of ColorWorking with darker skinned models is a bit different than lighter skinned models.

A Model of ColorA Model of ColorWorking with darker skinned models is a bit different than lighter skinned models.

 

 

Photographers who do nude work always have plenty of fabric on hand for draping.  I love sheer fabric when doing high-key photography!   Women love it too, as you can see below.  

 

A Model of Color with sheer yellow fabricA Model of Color with sheer yellow fabricWorking with darker skinned models is a bit different than lighter skinned models.

 

 

A Model of Color through sheer fabricA Model of Color through sheer fabricWorking with darker skinned models is a bit different than lighter skinned models.

 

That's all for this episode of the Beyond Boudoir Photo Blog.   Feel free to comment, like, or tweet.

 

 


Comments

Yucel(non-registered)
Why the 1.2 and not the 1.4?
concubineotk(non-registered)
So gorgeous, a very romantic sexy feel. Love the fabric draping, especially the last shot, beautiful fabric, so lacy.
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